October 20, 2017

From Pope Francis’ Christmas Message

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Dear brothers and sisters, today, in this world, in this humanity, is born the Saviour, who is Christ the Lord. Let us pause before the Child of Bethlehem. Let us allow our hearts to be touched, let us not fear this. Let us not fear that our hearts be moved. We need this! Let us allow ourselves to be warmed by the tenderness of God; we need his caress. God’s caresses do not harm us. They give us peace and strength. We need his caresses. God is full of love: to him be praise and glory forever! God is peace: let us ask him to help us to be peacemakers each day, in our life, in our families, in our cities and nations, in the whole world. Let us allow ourselves to be moved by God’s goodness.

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Here you may find the entire text of Urbi et Orbi, the Pope’s 2013 Christmas message.

Comments

  1. That’s a wonderful message.

  2. “Let us..”

    Who is this message about?

    • Why Steve, it’s about iceberg, romaine, escarole and chicory of course.
      Such a silly question.

    • petrushka1611 says:

      He that hath ears to hear, let him hear….

    • Steve, I’m not sure what your point is, but I’ll point to Hebrews 10:22-25 for similar language.

      “…let us draw near to God with a sincere heart and with the full assurance that faith brings, having our hearts sprinkled to cleanse us from a guilty conscience and having our bodies washed with pure water. Let us hold unswervingly to the hope we profess, for he who promised is faithful. And let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love and good deeds, not giving up meeting together, as some are in the habit of doing, but encouraging one another—and all the more as you see the Day approaching.” (NIV)

    • “Dear brothers and sisters…” is how this paragraph begins.

    • today, in this world, in this humanity, is born the Saviour, who is Christ the Lord

      God’s caresses do not harm us. They give us peace and strength. We need his caresses. God is full of love: to him be praise and glory forever! God is peace

      Sounds like it’s about the goodness of God in sending Jesus. The “let us” imperatives are all rooted in the good gifts freely given as impetus for our grateful obedience. IMO, not a bad piece of law/gospel distinction for a Roman Catholic!

    • *reads Steve Martin’s comment*


      *facepalm followed by shaking of head*

      I don’t see anything else apart from Gospel in Pope Francis’ message. Steve is the one however who is preaching more Law in my view.

  3. Francis conveys in this letter a powerful trust in God, and especially his goodness. I/we need to hear and see that simple trust in view of all the apparent evidence around us otherwise.

  4. I guess the Christmas message is about “us”…and what we ought do.

    Ok…

    Some things never change about the Roman religion.

    • Steve, if you’re going to criticize that message, I feel sorry for you. You’re missing out on the beauty and grace of some wonderful words because you can’t let go of whatever it is you want to hold onto.

      • Rick,

        I’ll criticize any Christian message that puts the onus on “us”. For that is law.

        A better idea is to put the onus, the focus on Christ Jesus and what He has done for us…the ungodly who are unwilling to love God, and the neighbor as the self.

        • Well, we’ll have to disagree on this one, and I still think you’re focusing on the wrong thing. The “let us”-es of Pope Francis’ message are about as non-Law-oriented as one can get and more meditative and encouraging than anything. And anyway…the “let us” part of his message makes up only about 10% of his message. The whole opening is very glorifying of God and Christ.

    • I think the Pope is reminding “us” not to get the way of grace–not block the work of the Spirit since it is the Spirit who really does all the work. Is that message really that antithetical to basic Christianity?

    • I’d say he is more preaching the Gospel to its sweetest than he is the Law to its harshest. Walther Thesis XXV: “You are not rightly distinguishing Law and Gospel int he Word of God if you do not allow the Gospel to predominate in your teaching.” 50 Wittenberg points for Pope Francis!

  5. flatrocker says:

    Kind of like Paul fixating on the people in Colossae and Galatia and Corinth et. al. How narcissistic and self-centered can a guy get? Pity poor Paul – to actually have the audacity to address those misguided apostates when there’s real soul savin’ that needs to be preached.

    In this case, some things shouldn’t change. Thanks for pointing it out.