May 28, 2017

About Chaplain Mike

Chaplain Mike works with a hospice organization in central Indiana. He has been in pastoral ministry since 1978, serving in churches in Maryland, Vermont, Illinois, and Indiana before moving into chaplaincy work. He is married to a wonderful gifted wife, Gail, and they have four children and three grandchildren. He thinks baseball is the greatest game ever invented, suffers annually as a Chicago Cubs fan, and is looking forward to putting on a cap again this spring to coach his grandson's Little League team. He loves a wide variety of music, spends way too much money on books, is happy to live in a place where there are four seasons, and is a "true believer" in Apple computers, having used them since 1988. Luther is his favorite theologian, Bach his favorite composer, James Taylor his favorite singer-songwriter, Chicago his favorite city, and hiking his favorite form of exercise. He would love to do more with photography and dreams of having a place in the mountains of Arizona some day. His heart has been captured by the grace of God in Jesus Christ and considers himself a post-evangelical disciple seeking a Jesus-shaped life and hoping to help the church do the same. He is forever grateful to his friend, Michael Spencer, for giving him an opportunity to write for Internet Monk.

My Own Desert Places

They cannot scare me with their empty places Between stars — on stars where no human race is. I have it in me so much nearer home To scare myself with my own desert places. – Robert Frost, “Desert Places” One temptation is to think the wilderness is without — a place, a geography, a […]

Street Corner Philosophy

Eloquent, yet accessible.

Enjoying an Abnormal Normal

When a friend calls to me from the road And slows his horse to a meaning walk, I don’t stand still and look around On all the hills I haven’t hoed, And shout from where I am, “What is it?” No, not as there is a time to talk. I thrust my hoe in the […]

The Gettysburg Address

One hundred and fifty years ago, more than 30,000 soldiers had died or were wounded after three days of battle at Gettysburg, July 1-3, 1863. Four and a half months later, in one of the greatest speeches of American history, President Abraham Lincoln took part in a ceremony to dedicate the Soldiers’ National Cemetery at […]

Cast Your Vote for “The Greatest American…”

UPDATE: Here, at the end of good day of house painting with my family, I have added my votes to the post. * * * Happy Independence Day in the U.S.A.! Today, just for fun and discussion, between hot dogs, we’re taking your votes for “The Greatest American _____________ “ — in seven categories. Cast […]

Let’s Discuss: Needing the Whole Body of Christ

I thought we might have an open discussion today on some thoughts by Brian Zahnd. As one who has served in “charismatic flavored evangelicalism,” he found that he had become “arrogantly sectarian,” and that he “needed the riches of the whole church” if his life was to be fully formed in Christ. Click on the […]

Summer Sounds from CM: That Sunny 60’s Sound

Since it is officially summer in the good ol’ U.S.A. now, I have been listening to some of that happy music that used to play on AM radio when I was a kid, the great summery songs that played over the sound system at the pool. It spoke of freedom, romance, and the idealism of […]

Some Thoughts on Our “Reformation” Conversation

Monday, we considered the June 17, 2013 document, jointly published by the Roman Catholic Church and the Lutheran World Federation, called “From Conflict to Communion.”  I have decided to make this last post in the series, and in it I want to make some comments about how we discuss matters like this. An Admission of […]

Commemorating the Reformation Together (2)

This week (today and Thursday) we are considering the June 17, 2013 document, jointly published by the Roman Catholic Church and the Lutheran World Federation, called “From Conflict to Communion.” The paper’s introduction states: In 2017, Lutheran and Catholic Christians will commemorate together the 500th anniversary of the beginning of the Reformation. Lutherans and Catholics […]

Commemorating the Reformation Together (1)

This morning I introduce my particular topic for the week that we will look at today and Thursday. You may have read the blurb on the Internet Monk Bulletin Board (right side of the page) and noticed that Roman Catholics and Lutherans have come together and produced a document that expresses their commitment to commemorate […]